Wednesday, 14 March 2018

Postdoctoral positions available on Greek New Testament commentaries



All involve work on Greek New Testament commentary manuscripts, to start this autumn. One is on the AHRC-funded Codex Zacynthius project, using multispectral imaging to recover the text of the earliest catena on Luke. Two are on the ERC-funded CATENA project, producing a catalogue of commentary manuscripts, identifying different stages in their history and development and making electronic transcriptions and editions of their text.

The posts would be suitable for patristics scholars with experience of working with Greek manuscripts.
Further details and links to the application portal may be found at:
http://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/BIK271/
or

Candidates may apply for one or more of these positions. The deadline is 11th April 2018.

In addition, the CATENA project is advertising a funded doctoral studentship on the Pseudo-Oecumenian Catena on Romans, suitable for candidates with expertise in Greek and an interest in manuscripts. Further information and application link at:
Closing date 9th April 2018.

Informal queries may be addressed to Dr Hugh Houghton by email (links on the webpages above)

Call for Papers for 19th International Patristics Conference now open

The call for papers for the 19th International Patristics Conference at Oxford from 19–24 August 2019 is now open.


Abstracts for short papers and workshop contributions may be submitted at: https://app.oxfordabstracts.com/stages/213/submission


Registration for the conference takes place at:
https://app.oxfordabstracts.com/events/201/delegate-registration


Further details may be found on the website at:
https://www.oxfordpatristics.com/

Thursday, 8 February 2018

Call for Papers, Seventh British Patristics Conference, Cardiff University, 5-7 September 2018

The Seventh British Patristic Conference is going to be held at Cardiff University this autumn (5-7 September 2018).

All further information you will find at www.britishpatristics.org

Thursday, 12 October 2017

Research position available on Latin Christianity in Late Antiquity

Research Fellow or Senior Research Fellow (Latin Christianity in Late Antiquity)


Australian Catholic University

• Full-time, Research appointment, five-year fixed-term or ongoing
• Based at ACU’s Melbourne Campus

ACU’s Institute for Religion and Critical Inquiry seeks candidates for a position in Latin literature, culture, and ideas in Late Antiquity. Candidates must have a track record of outstanding potential and demonstrated achievement and show how they could contribute to the project entitled ‘Modes of Knowing and the Ordering of Knowledge in Early Christianity’ (led by Professor Lewis Ayres), and also develop further research projects. For further information, please see the ‘Position Purpose’ in the Position Description.

Research Fellows and Senior Research Fellows have a primary focus on research but some teaching, especially of graduate students, may be required. They will be expected to develop their own research leading to high-quality publications, to participate in collaborative research within the ‘Modes of Knowing’ project and the Centre for Biblical and Early Christian Studies, and to contribute to the collegial life of the Institute.





Wednesday, 27 September 2017

Eusebius of Caesarea, Against Marcellus and On Ecclesiastical Theology

I am glad to announce that the translation of Eusebius of Caesarea's works Against Marcellus and On Ecclesiastical Theology which is about to appear in the series 'The Fathers of the Church' as been made available for pre-order:

Eusebius of Caesarea, Against Marcellus and On Ecclesiastical Theology
It is the product of an almost 25 years collaborative enterprise between Kelley McCarthy Spoerl (St Anselm) and myself, and we are both happy that after so many years we were able to complete this task. Eusebius is not easy to translate, although these are the two works which are of particular historical relevance, though with the exception of an Italian translation of On Ecclesiastical Theology the works have never been translated into a modern European language. Here, we are given rare insights into the immediate time before and after Nicaea 325 CE, and how the debate developed in the decade after Nicaea. 

Saturday, 23 September 2017

Name-dropping in the Letters of Ignatius of Antioch (Short, Middle and Long Recension)

Working on the final chapter (Ignatius of Antioch) of my new, forthcoming book on 'Retrospective Patristics - A Guide to Early Christians' (hence I have been less productive on the blog here as I did primary research), I noticed an interesting phenomenon, related to the appearance of names. I'd like to share this as a snippet to discuss this with you.

            In order to get a sense of links that are made through names (not listed are biblical names, and names of heretics), the following table lists the names that appear in the letters of Ignatius (often, but not exclusively in salutations) (x set in bold means that the name also appears in the Short Recension, x set in brackets means that the name only appears in the Long Recension where letters exist also in the Middle or Short Recensions):


Pol
Eph
Rom
Mag
Tral
Philad
Sm
Phil
Tar
Ant
Her
Mar
MarCIgn
Polycarp
x
x

x


x
x

x
x


Epitropus’ wife
x












Attalus
x












Alce
x





x






Crocus

x
x










Burrhus

x



x
x






Euplus

x











Fronto

x











Onesimus

x







x
x


Bassus



x









Apollonius



x









Sotio



x









Anencletus




x








Bitus/Philo





(x)/x
(x)/x
x
x
x
x


Gaius/Rheus





(x)/x
(x)/x






Agathopus





x
x
x
x
x



Damas



x
x





x


Polybius




x




x
x


Tavias






x






Daphnus






x






Eutecnus






x






Linus




(x)






x

Clement




(x)
(x)





x

Hero










x
x

Cassian









x
x
x

Maris









x


x
Evodius





(x)







Mary










x
x
x
Vitalius







x





Euphanius







x





Eulogius












x
Sobelius












x

The three main Ignatian Recensions are very different in their dealing with names. While the Middle Recension is a real name-dropper, the Short Recension only gives us three names: Ignatius himself (not listed here) as author of the letters and the two addressees, Onesimus, bishop of Ephesus, and Polycarp. Ignatius – his cognomen ‘Theophoros’, as shown above, seems to be a 6th c. addition – is introduced and right in the beginning of IgnEph 1 etymologically (ܪܬܚܢ; ἀναζωπυρήσαντες) explained. ‘Ignatius’ means the one who is ‘kindled’, ‘sparked’ or ‘heated’ by God’s blood. Likewise, the name of ‘Onesimus’ has an etymological meaning which is indicated by the way he is introduced when mention is made that Ignatius has ‘received your abundance in the name of God’, ‘Onesimus’ meaning ‘aiding, succouring, beneficial’ (LSJ). The only person’s name that is not etymologically explained is that of Polycarp, an indication that this might have been the only self-explanatory one with a historical figure behind it.

            In contrast to the sparse and particular use of names in the Short Recension, we see a sheer name-dropping in the Middle Recension, one of its characteristics. It gives us a network of twentyone different names. Interestingly, from the nine names that the Middle Recension has in the three letters that are also present in the Short Recension, IgnPol, IgnEph, and IgnRom, only those three names will re-appear in the Long Recension which can be found presicely in the three letters of the Short Recension, Ignatius, Onesimus and Polycarp – not a single one of the other six. Moreover, only three of the other twelve names that the Middle Recension has in the other four letters, will re-appear in the Long Recension (Agathopus, Damas, Polybius), two will be replaced by other names, Bitus by Philo, Gaius by Rheus, in both cases potentially based on misspellings during the transmission. It is certainly of importance that the Long Recension introduces a very different spectrum of names than those which are given by the Middle Recension, while the Long Recension only adheres to the names of the Short Recension. If the Short Recension had been an abbreviation of the Middle Recension this would be hardly explicable, whereas the redactor who expanded the Middle Recension into the Long Recension still must have known the Short Recension with the three names, and even taken this Recension as historically a more reliable reference text in terms of names than that of the Middle Recension. In any case, based on the occurence of names, the Long Recension appears as a competing version to that of the Middle Recension.